The 2AM Demo Call

August 30, 2012

When you’re a startup, your time zone is everywhere. Our hours revolve around our users’ hours. We don’t complain and we don’t fuss about it. We actually love it. Talking to our users is one of the most important things we can do to build solid relationships. For the past few weeks we’re having a … Continue reading “The 2AM Demo Call”

The Prompt and Nudge

August 21, 2012

We spend a lot of time thinking about how our customers might use our app. We usually use this time as a relaxation period where we sit around on the couch and just throw out ideas. It’s useful and gets the mind going. Once in a while we come upon ideas worth sharing. Reamaze is … Continue reading “The Prompt and Nudge”

Customer “Support” Should Just Be Customer Operations

July 31, 2012

Wikipedia defines customer support as “a range of customer services to assist customers in making cost effective and correct use of a product. It includes assistance in planning, installation, training, trouble shooting, maintenance, upgrading, and disposal of a product”. It defines customer service as “the provision of service to customers before, during and after a … Continue reading “Customer “Support” Should Just Be Customer Operations”

Live Chat vs. Dead Chat

July 25, 2012

I’ve always been a big fan of live chat, especially in times of urgent need. Adopting a live chat system is a big commitment for any business and the reasons for having one are simple: reassurance and instant gratification. Live chat is a great choice for businesses with a larger operation and a larger customer … Continue reading “Live Chat vs. Dead Chat”

Bargaining for an iPhone case in Beijing

Image Source: Google Images

Learning to bargain is a crucial rite-of-passage. The best place for learning how to do it right is China. Everything is negotiable in China. Wanna buy a TV at a department store? Negotiable. Thinking about having lunch at a local restaurant? Negotiable. Investing in a new suit at a premium department store? Still negotiable. Buying medicine? Negotiable even still. Bargaining is a culture in China. Don’t feel offended or surprised if you find yourself running into price barriers based on how you look, dress, or smell. There are plenty of strategies online for what to say, how to say it, and when to just call it a day. My particular experience involves a knockoff iPhone 4 case sold at an subterranean electronics and gadgets night market in Beijing.

The most amazing thing about bargaining in China is that the salesman/woman always seems to be right. They’re luminaries when it comes to identifying, segmenting, and analyzing customer profiles. Their marketing, sales, customer service, and retention skills are absolutely systematic and refined. From the moment you start drifting toward their storefront until the moment you leave you’re under constant evaluation, monitoring, and nurturing. Anything you say or do is a reflection of your desire to empty your wallet. Messaging is brilliant. Neither nonchalant nor pushy. The perfect balance of hard sales and comfy persuasion. Some sales people even speak up to 5 different languages. If you buy something, you’ll always end up walking out feeling like a champ. Retention is flawless. They hover on the fringe of losing a sale but never too in danger of actually losing it. All of this combined makes bargaining in China a rather challenging mental and physical exercise.

July 23, 2012

Image Source: Google Images

Learning to bargain is a crucial rite-of-passage. The best place for learning how to do it right is China. Everything is negotiable in China. Wanna buy a TV at a department store? Negotiable. Thinking about having lunch at a local restaurant? Negotiable. Investing in a new suit at a premium department store? Still negotiable. Buying medicine? Negotiable even still. Bargaining is a culture in China. Don’t feel offended or surprised if you find yourself running into price barriers based on how you look, dress, or smell. There are plenty of strategies online for what to say, how to say it, and when to just call it a day. My particular experience involves a knockoff iPhone 4 case sold at an subterranean electronics and gadgets night market in Beijing.

The most amazing thing about bargaining in China is that the salesman/woman always seems to be right. They’re luminaries when it comes to identifying, segmenting, and analyzing customer profiles. Their marketing, sales, customer service, and retention skills are absolutely systematic and refined. From the moment you start drifting toward their storefront until the moment you leave you’re under constant evaluation, monitoring, and nurturing. Anything you say or do is a reflection of your desire to empty your wallet. Messaging is brilliant. Neither nonchalant nor pushy. The perfect balance of hard sales and comfy persuasion. Some sales people even speak up to 5 different languages. If you buy something, you’ll always end up walking out feeling like a champ. Retention is flawless. They hover on the fringe of losing a sale but never too in danger of actually losing it. All of this combined makes bargaining in China a rather challenging mental and physical exercise.